Atashgah (Fire Temple) of Isfahan | Relics of Ancient Iran

Atashgah (Fire Temple) of Isfahan | Relics of Ancient Iran

The Atashgah (Fire Temple) of Isfahan or Mount Atashgah (Fire Temple) is one of the historical monuments of the city of Isfahan and it is a relics of ancient Iran. This monument has an ancient historical background and has several usages at different times. The Atashgah (Fire Temple) of Isfahan was registered in the year 1330 and with number of 380 in the National Iranian Book List.

Atashgah Architecture

The Atashgah (Fire Temple) is considered for the use of wood among the clay walls as well as the architecture assigned to the Mesopotamian architecture. According to an archaeological group from Italy, led by the famous Italian archaeologist Professor Galdieri, the life span of materials used at the Atashgah (Fire Temple) building was about 1400 BC.

Atashgah Isfahan (Fire Temple)
Atashgah Isfahan (Fire Temple)

The Name of Atashgah

The original name of the ancient city is Mehrabin or Mehrabin’s castle or Mehrabin fire temple, and now it’s called “Atashgah” (Fire Temple) or “Atishgah” (in the slang speeches).

Feature of the Building

The Atashgah (Fire Temple) hill is made up with sedimentary rocks. Its low level is at the 1610 meters above sea level and higher level is at an altitude of 1715 meters above sea level. The Atashgah (Fire Temple) is a large and circular fireplace with multiple valves. This building is made from raw clay with a length of 40 cm and a diameter of 14 cm and all materials, clay, mud and grit were extracted from Zayanderud.

Atashgah Isfahan (Fire Temple)
Atashgah Isfahan (Fire Temple)

Scientists have confirmed the existence of the oldest community centers around this ancient hill; issues such as the presence of the Mount Atashgah (Fire Temple) in the Mehrabin flat plain and the building built above it, as well as the proximity of one of the most ancient villages of Isfahan with it (the Sedeh and Khomeini-Shahr).

Bricks

The point of interest in this building is its Bricks; in the past, the use of large raw Brick has been very difficult. Because when it was made of brick, it was separated and not strong. But the brick of this building is relatively large. This is due to the usage of convectional materials with addition of fife of Zayanderud. Fifes are make a strong construction in the materials of this monument.

Atashgah Isfahan (Fire Temple)
Atashgah Isfahan (Fire Temple)

History of Atashgah

The construction time of the building dates back to the Sassanid era. The IZMEO Institute Studies (IZMEO) dates back the Atashgah (Fire Temple) building to the era of civilization of Elam and the government called Anzan. This idea is confirmed by studies and researches on the fire temples of the Sassanid era in Natanz, Kashan, Yazd, Azerbaijan and Na’in, because in those days they did not build the fire temples on the mountain or on the hill. So, they were built in places where access to them is easy. Thus, with the certainty we can say, Atashgah (Fire Temple) of Isfahan is a sign of the presence of earlier civilizations than the Sassanid’s and the earlier dynasties. Since the structure of Atashgah (Fire Temple) was made by bricks and clay, it is naturally vulnerable to natural complications and it has suffered a lot of damage that reviving, strength and stability operation has been done on it.

Atashgah Isfahan (Fire Temple)
Atashgah Isfahan (Fire Temple)

Geographical Location

The Atashgah (Fire Temple) hill is made up with sedimentary rocks. Its low level is at the 1610 meters above sea level and higher level is at an altitude of 1715 meters above sea level. The Atashgah (Fire Temple) is a large and circular fireplace with multiple valves. This building is made from raw clay with a length of 40 cm and a diameter of 14 cm and all materials, clay, mud and grit were extracted from Zayanderud. This building is located on a mountain near the Zayanderud. From the top of this hill, you can see up to miles from the four main sides.

Visiting the Atashgah of Isfahan

Address: West of Isfahan, 8 km to the city center, Atashgah St., south of Khomeini-Shahr

It has Entrance Ticket

Visit time: 24 hours

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